Safety for Whom? Racist Policing in Communities and Schools
JusticeAid 2021 Spring Forum

Photography by sheilapreebright.com
Did you miss the event? Watch the recording on YouTube.

The JusticeAid 2021 Spring Forum, Safety For Whom? Racist Policing in Communities and Schools, was held on May 2, 2021 in partnership with The Riverside Church of New York and introduced JusticeAid’s 2021 grantee partner NDS PACE. A panel of trusted voices shared insights and challenged us to think hard about these questions:

  • How can we end our nation’s legacy of racist policing?
  • What steps can we take together to eliminate the presence of police in our schools and the use of excessive force altogether?
  • What could real justice look like? 

The Forum featured a keynote address by Sherrilyn Ifill, President and Director-Counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund (LDF), a personal statement from US Rep. Cori Bush (MO-01), and a compelling conversation moderated by Angela J. Davis, Distinguished Professor of Law, American University Washington College of Law, with panelists Rick Jones, Executive Director NDS PACE; Kristin Nicole Henning, Professor of Law and Director of the Juvenile Justice Clinic and Juvenile Justice Initiative at Georgetown Law; and Sally Lee, Founder and Executive Director, Teachers Unite.

The event opened and closed with special musical performances by The Resistance Revival Chorus and Matthew Whitaker.

SHERRILYN IFILL
President and Director-Counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund (LDF)
Keynote
US REP. CORI BUSH
Missouri’s First Congressional District
PROF. ANGELA J. DAVIS
Distinguished Professor of Law
American University Washington College of Law
Moderator
RICK JONES
Executive Director NDS PACE
Panelist
KRIS HENNING
Blume Professor of Law and Director of the Juvenile Justice Clinic and Initiative, Georgetown Law
Panelist
SALLY LEE
Founder and Executive Director, Teachers Unite
Panelist

Sheila Pree Bright is an Atlanta-based, award-winning fine art photographer nationally known for her photographic series Young AmericansPlastic BodiesSuburbia1960 Who, and #1960Now. Bright is described as a “social cultural anthropologist” whose works combine a wide range of contemporary culture including photographic portrayals and provocative commentary on American beauty standards, urban and suburban themes, citizenship, and social movements.

JusticeAid supporters share a passion for justice and a love for the arts. Learn about police accountability, persuade someone of its importance, and let’s rally together to make the world a better place.